Open navClose nav

Category: Frontend Friday

Creating Lambda@Edge and Route 53 Resources with CloudFormation

Previously, I showed you how to automatically provision AWS resources with CloudFormation. CloudFormation provides a concise, declarative syntax for configuring a “stack” of AWS resources. Given the sizable catalog of services provided by AWS, and the need to connect services together for most use cases, being able to declare a stack of connected services all together in a single configuration file will help you keep track of your project’s infrastructure and reduce the likelihood of misconfiguration.

Automate Your Static Hosting Environment With AWS CloudFormation

I love automation. If you’ve been following this blog, you’ll know I’ve written a few times about using continuous integration to automate the deployment of your software. Why stop at deployment? Can we use automation to improve our infrastructure? The answer, unsurprisingly, is yes (this would be a pretty short article otherwise.) There are many different tools out there that can be used to automate the provisioning of hosting infrastructure.

Create In-App Documentation For Content Editors

Say you’re writing some code and you hit a road block: what was the name of that method again? Which parameters do I need to send in this API request? What does this error message mean? At times like this, developers reach for the documentation. Ideally, this documentation is close at hand in order to minimize the interruption to your coding flow. Forestry’s content editor plays an interesting role in the creation of static sites.

In Search of the Best Continuous Deployment Service

We’ve written before about the advantages of automated deployment, particularly for static sites. Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment are a ubiquitous strategy for managing the release of software. There are several options out there for running your CI/CD pipelines, with their own strengths and weaknesses. Which one should you use? In this article, we will look at 5 different services that you can use to build, test, and deploy your code.

Keeping Content DRY: Data Relationships In Hugo

Don’t Repeat Yourself is the perennial mantra of the software developer. It doesn’t mean you should never do the same thing twice, but instead refers to having a single, authoritative source of truth for every piece of information used in your software. Don’t Repeat Yourself is frequently applied to code, where knowledge is susceptible to duplication through the copying and pasting of code blocks where an abstraction should be used instead.

VuePress Brings Your Documentation to Life

VuePress is a static site generator based on Vue JavaScript framework. With the first release appearing back in April and the current version being 0.14.1, VuePress is a young project that shows a lot of promise. VuePress has the flexibility to build any static site, but it particularly excels at working with documentation. In this article, I’ll show you how to adapt your docs to VuePress for documentation that survives on Github, but thrives on its own.

Creating a Multilingual Blog With Jekyll

Reaching an international audience means having international content. Having your content available in multiple languages is great for maximizing your potential audience. On top of that, ensuring your multilingual site’s content is easy to edit is especially important, to enable translators without development experience to work effectively and reduce the incidence of translation errors. In this post, I will explore how to set up a Jekyll site to support multiple languages, and use Forestry to provide an interface for creating translations.

Why We Created a Git-Backed Content Manager

Software developers have long used Version Control Systems for tracking changes to code. Any code project will benefit greatly from using version control, and any developer worth her salt should be wary of a codebase that does not use version control. Version control makes it easy to monitor changes to code, track down bugs, and manage releases. Forestry’s content manager is supported by Git, one of the most popular version control systems available today.

Creating a Form Builder With Formspree and Forestry Blocks

When we announced the Blocks feature, we touted it as a great way to create a page builder for your site. While this use case drove the development of Blocks, we knew there would be other interesting things that could be done with it. When I previously showed you how to integrate Snipcart with your Forestry site, I used Blocks to configure custom fields for Snipcart products. Today, I’m going to take that idea to a whole new level by using Blocks to create a full-fledged form builder that your website editors can use to create web forms.

Add Functionality to Your Hugo Site With Theme Components

Theme Components are a relatively new addition to Hugo, first appearing in the 0.42 release. When Hugo looks for certain files (such as data and layout files,) it will first look in the top level of your project, and then look in the subdirectory of themes/ that matches the theme you have set in config.toml. Previously, you could only specify a single theme in your config.toml file. The way theme components work is pretty simple: they allow you to specify an array of themes in config.